Hormone Panels

The endocrine system is one of the body's main systems for communicating, controlling and coordinating the body's work. It works with the nervous system, reproductive system, kidneys, gut, liver and fat to help maintain and control the following:

 

- Body energy levels

- Reproduction

- Growth and development

- Internal balance of body systems, called homeostasis

- Responses to surroundings, stress, and injury

 

The endocrine system accomplishes these tasks via a network of glands and organs that produce, store, and secrete certain hormones. Hormones are special chemicals that move into body fluid after they are made by one cell or a group of cells. Hormones cause an effect on other cells or tissues of the body.

Endocrine glands make hormones that are used inside the body. Other glands make substances like saliva, which reach the outside of the body. Endocrine glands and endocrine-related organs are like factories. They produce and store hormones and release them as needed. When the body needs these substances, the bloodstream carries the hormones to specific targets. These targets may be organs, tissues, or cells. To function normally, the body needs glands that work correctly, a blood supply that works well to move hormones through the body to their target points, receptor places on the target cells for the hormones to do their work, and a system for controlling how hormones are produced and used.

What could go wrong? Endocrine disorders happen when one or more of the endocrine systems in your body are not working well. Hormones may be released in amounts that are too great or too small for the body to work normally. There may not be enough receptors, or binding sites, for the hormones so that they can direct the work that needs to be done. There could be a problem with the system regulating the hormones in the blood stream, or the body may have difficulty controlling hormone levels because of problems clearing hormones from the blood. For example, a person's liver or kidneys may not be working well and this might keep too high a hormone level in the bloodstream. We can find out if you have trouble detoxifying by doing a Detox Genetic Test as well as a hormone panel.

Hormone disruption and imbalance is a great cause for concern in the modern world as our systems are bombarded with endocrine disruptors and chemicals that mimic our own hormones, especially estrogen which when accumulated in the body can lead to reproductive cancers in both women and men, low sperm count in men and infertility in both women and men. Hormonal disorders and imbalances can also lead to autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular disease, stress disorders, chronic illness, menstrual irregularities, obesity, immune dysfunction, osteoporosis, and thyroid disorders.

Great Smokies Labs Endocrine/Hormone Panels

 

Women's Hormonal Health Assessment provides a focused overview of hormonal balance in both pre- and post-menopausal women, using a single serum sample to evaluate dynamics of sex steroid metabolism that can profoundly affect a woman's health throughout her lifetime.

Estrogen Metabolism Assessments, Urine or Serum evaluates how estrogen is being processed in the body. The tests yield clinical insight into many estrogen-dependent conditions and provide important tools for monitoring dietary, lifestyle and hormone therapies.

Comprehensive Thyroid Assessment is a comprehensive analysis of thyroid hormone secretion and metabolism, including central thyroid regulation and activity, peripheral thyroid function, and thyroid autoimmunity. This serum test allows the practitioner to pinpoint commonly occurring imbalances that underlie a broad spectrum of chronic illness.

Bone Resorption Assessment is a simple, direct urinary assay of pyridinium crosslinks and deoxypyridinoline, useful in identifying current rate of bone loss, lytic bone disease, and efficacy of bone support therapies.

Adrenocortex Stress Profile is a salivary assay of cortisol and DHEA, imbalances of which are associated with ailments ranging from obesity and menstrual disorders to immune deficiency and increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Male Hormone Profile analyzes four saliva samples over a 24-hour period for levels of testosterone. Elevated levels suggest androgen resistance, while decreased levels can result from such causes as hypogonadism, hepatic cirrhosis, lipid abnormalities and aging. The comprehensive profile includes the Adrenocortex Stress Profile and the Comprehensive Melatonin Profile to reveal how testosterone is influenced by cortisol, DHEA, and melatonin.

Female Hormone Profile analyzes eleven saliva samples over a 28-day period for the levels of ß-estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone, providing clues about menstrual irregularities, infertility, endometriosis, breast cancer, and osteoporosis. The comprehensive profile includes the Adrenocortex Stress Profile and the Comprehensive Melatonin Profile to reveal how the sex hormones are influenced by cortisol, DHEA, and melatonin.

Menopause Profile examines three salivary samples over a 5-day period to determine levels of ß-estradiol, estriol, estrone, progesterone, and testosterone for women who are menopausal. The comprehensive profile includes the Adrenocortex Stress Profile and the Comprehensive Melatonin Profile to reveal how the sex hormones are affected by the influences of cortisol, DHEA, and melatonin.

Comprehensive Melatonin Profile analyzes three saliva samples for the secretion pattern of this important hormone. Melatonin imbalance has been associated with Seasonal Affective Disorder, infertility, sleep disorders, and compromised immune function.